Veganism is now more popular than ever before, whether one is propelled to this gastronomic path due to abundance of studies that show their incontrovertible health benefits, or for more self-indulgent moralistic (high-minded) reasons.

Do you have a vegan option? Is this suitable for vegans? It’s not vegan I can’t have that. All of these things come to disrupt our current natural paradigm, in a negative way. We might think at first that all immediate changes to a long established way of life could be considered as a threat or perceived as a personal attack.

However, having experienced the bold and, at times, arrogant veganic conversion first hand, I am inclined to sympathise with those of you who are exasperated with this bellicose individual. For the most part, an individual who is not representative the group will take the first radical step towards veganism.

So this is where I find myself, an avid meat eater who can go the odd day without eating meat. I think most people also have days where they don’t feel like consuming meat products or simply feel like their dietary needs have been fulfilled; so am I a vegan on those days?

I don’t consider the absence of meat in my daily diet to be a life changing feat or something that deserves such recognition. I have often pondered this and one of the few reasons why vegans upset me is that they feel the need to have a special label of their own, I eat meat but I don’t label myself as a carnivore.

As I enter my favourite pub-grub chain I don’t enquire, “what do you have that’s carnivore friendly”. It all comes down to treating others as you yourself want to be treated. I don’t need or desire a special category for something that at the end of the day is an action. Along with every other human being, I put something in my mouth, strip said thing of nutrients and excrete it from other orifices. Food is food and veganism is just so.

Elans Cederstrem